This could be the real world

via bookporn · originally by smellslikeateensblog
posted 1 day ago with 718 notes

taco—senpai:
School library post earthquake.

taco—senpai:

School library post earthquake.

via bookporn · originally by taco--senpai
"It’s hell writing and it’s hell not writing. The only tolerable state is having just written."
— Robert Hass (via victoriousvocabulary)
via chucknoblet · originally by victoriousvocabulary

Istanbul’s amazing book benches

Benches placed in puclic places such as parks and bus tops all over the city. The project covers the works of 18 classic Turkish authors and each bench ir opened in the most memorable page of the book.

Sources: 1, 2

via bookporn

meulin-weipon:

cityofbadass:

Do you ever wonder about how an author would describe you in a novel? Not only your appearance but the way you talk and laugh and hold yourself and all the expressions on your face?

image

via xninjarollins · originally by wingsofbadass
"Beware of self-indulgence. The romance surrounding the writing profession carries several myths: that one must suffer in order to be creative; that one must be cantankerous and objectionable in order to be bright; that ego is paramount over skill; that one can rise to a level from which one can tell the reader to go to hell. These myths, if believed, can ruin you.
If you believe you can make a living as a writer, you already have enough ego."
— David Brin (via writingquotes)
via writeworld · originally by writingquotes
nprbooks:

Image: South African novelist Nadine Gordimer poses during the 2006 Rome literature festival. (Tiziana Fabi/AFP/Getty Images)
Nadine Gordimer, a Nobel Prize-winning author famed for her portrayals of South Africa under apartheid, died Sunday, her family said in a statement. She was 90.
Gordimer was considered a modern literary genius, an important chronicler of the injustices of racial segregation. Three of her books were banned during apartheid.
"They showed how people were living here," Gordimer said in an NPR interview last year. “They showed what influences were shaping our lives. And they showed the many different reactions to it among different people here.”
More on Gordimer’s legacy here.

nprbooks:

Image: South African novelist Nadine Gordimer poses during the 2006 Rome literature festival. (Tiziana Fabi/AFP/Getty Images)

Nadine Gordimer, a Nobel Prize-winning author famed for her portrayals of South Africa under apartheid, died Sunday, her family said in a statement. She was 90.

Gordimer was considered a modern literary genius, an important chronicler of the injustices of racial segregation. Three of her books were banned during apartheid.

"They showed how people were living here," Gordimer said in an NPR interview last year. “They showed what influences were shaping our lives. And they showed the many different reactions to it among different people here.”

More on Gordimer’s legacy here.

via coolchicksfromhistory · originally by nprbooks

by kinixuki:
Bliss

by kinixuki:

Bliss

via bookporn · originally by kinixuki
via bookporn · originally by literatureismyutopia
"

the thing you are most
afraid to write.

write that.

"
— Nayyirah Waheed  (via aviolafyre)
via zoewashburne · originally by shebreathesmusic