This could be the real world

dancingtothelight:

I don’t know the source for this otherwise I’d give it
this is where I found it
but this is the most amazing solution to the biggest Harry Potter mystery
original source thanks to a lovely individual

dancingtothelight:

I don’t know the source for this otherwise I’d give it

this is where I found it

but this is the most amazing solution to the biggest Harry Potter mystery

original source thanks to a lovely individual

via sergeantjbuchanan · originally by dancingtothelight
"For many of these women, the reading experience begins from a place of seething rage. Take Sara Marcus’ initial impression of Jack Kerouac: “I remember putting On the Road down the first time a woman was mentioned. I was just like: ‘Fuck. You.’ I was probably 15 or 16. And over the coming years I realized that it was this canonical work, so I tried to return to it, but every time I was just like, ‘Fuck you.’” Tortorici had a similarly visceral reaction to Charles Bukowski: “I will never forget reading Bukowski’s Post Office and feeling so horrible, the way that the narrator describes the thickness of ugly women’s legs. I think it was the first time I felt like a book that I was trying to identify with rejected me. Though I did absorb it, and of course it made me hate my body or whatever.” Emily Witt turned to masculine texts to access a sexual language that was absent from books about women, but found herself turned off by their take: “many of the great classic coming-of-age novels about the female experience don’t openly discuss sex,” she says in No Regrets. “I read the ones by men instead, until I was like, ‘I cannot read another passage about masturbation. I can’t. It was like a pile of Kleenex.”

This isn’t just about the books. When young women read the hyper-masculine literary canon—what Emily Gould calls the “midcentury misogynists,” staffed with the likes of Roth, Mailer, and Miller—their discomfort is punctuated by the knowledge that their male peers are reading these books, identifying with them, and acting out their perspectives and narratives. These writers are celebrated by the society that we live in, even the one who stabbed his wife. In No Regrets, Elif Bautman talks about reading Henry Miller for the first time because she had a “serious crush” on a guy who said his were “the best books ever,” and that guy’s real-life recommendation exacerbated her distaste for the fictional. When she read Miller, “I felt so alienated by the books, and then thinking about this guy, and it was so hot and summertime … I just wanted to kill myself. … He compared women to soup.”"

In No Regrets, women writers talk about what it was like to read literature’s “midcentury misogynists.” (via becauseiamawoman)

Here’s a fun thing you learn when you study literature: the western canon is not universally beloved. Those books are not the Truth any more than the New York Post is skilled journalism. The main reason they’re held in such high esteem is because they were written by boring white dudes with rage fantasies and boring white dudes with rage fantasies also happen to be largely in charge of deciding which books are deemed classics and taught forever in the American school system.
So if your boyfriend tells you he loves Kerouac then you tell your boyfriend Kerouac was a fucking second rate hack who wrote Beat style because he didn’t have the skill or talent to write any other way, which is probably also why he just copied every adolescent male wanderlust story since the beginning of time. That shit’s derivative and boring.

(via saintthecla)

Everyone go read this immediately. As I decided last week, my life motto has been expanded from “Do your thing and don’t care if they like it” to include “If all your favorite books are by white men, I probably don’t think you’re a very interesting person.”

(via pollums)
via memorieslikeleaves · originally by Slate

frumplejames:

medievalpoc:

The Black Count is Being Adapted for a New Film!

Tom Reiss’s The Black Count, which details the true story of Général Thomas Alexandre Dumas (father of author Alexandre Dumas), is being adapted into a film directed by Cary Fukunaga (director of HBO’s True Detective).

No actors have been named so far, although some people are already speculating that Howard Charles may be considered for the lead. He’s known for playing the role of Porthos on the BBC’s Three Musketeers:

image

You can read a bit more about this story and hear an interview with the book’s author here at Indiewire.

You can read an excerpt of The Black Count here.

catholicaramis
via penthesileas · originally by medievalpoc

Bookshelf porn by Queenie and the Dew

Bookshelf porn by Queenie and the Dew

via bookporn · originally by book-pause
willkommen-in-germany:

Der Kölner Dom (Cologne Cathedral) is a Roman Catholic church in Köln (Cologne), Central-Western Germany. It’s a renowned monument of German Catholicism and Gothic architecture and a World Heritage Site. It is also Germany’s most visited landmark, attracting an average of 20,000 people a day. Construction commenced in 1248 and was halted in 1473, leaving it unfinished. Work restarted in the 19th century and was completed, to the original plan, in 1880. The cathedral is the largest Gothic church in Northern Europe and has the 2nd-tallest spires (after Ulm Minster, also in Germany). Its 2 huge spires give it the largest façade of any church in the world. The choir has the largest height to width ratio, 3.6:1, of any medieval church. Cologne’s medieval builders had planned a grand structure to house the reliquary of the Three Kings and fit its role as a place of worship for the Holy Roman Emperor. The cathedral suffered 14 hits by aerial bombs during WW2. It did not collapse, but stood tall in an otherwise flattened city. 
http://koelner-dom.de/

willkommen-in-germany:

Der Kölner Dom (Cologne Cathedral) is a Roman Catholic church in Köln (Cologne), Central-Western Germany. It’s a renowned monument of German Catholicism and Gothic architecture and a World Heritage Site. It is also Germany’s most visited landmark, attracting an average of 20,000 people a day. Construction commenced in 1248 and was halted in 1473, leaving it unfinished. Work restarted in the 19th century and was completed, to the original plan, in 1880. The cathedral is the largest Gothic church in Northern Europe and has the 2nd-tallest spires (after Ulm Minster, also in Germany). Its 2 huge spires give it the largest façade of any church in the world. The choir has the largest height to width ratio, 3.6:1, of any medieval church. Cologne’s medieval builders had planned a grand structure to house the reliquary of the Three Kings and fit its role as a place of worship for the Holy Roman Emperor. The cathedral suffered 14 hits by aerial bombs during WW2. It did not collapse, but stood tall in an otherwise flattened city. 

http://koelner-dom.de/

via mor-iarty · originally by willkommen-in-germany

aegontargaryen:

friendly reminder that if harry would have been a girl snape would have treated her like petyr baelish treats sansa stark ✿◕‿◕✿

via mor-iarty · originally by aegontargaryen
via starlorrd · originally by guardiansofthegalaxy
nanettelepore:

*gasp*

nanettelepore:

*gasp*

via universepepperland · originally by nanettelepore
via kimcooperx · originally by stormbringer14